How to Handle Probate in New Jersey

Probate is the legal process through which the assets of a deceased person are distributed to their heirs or beneficiaries. In New Jersey, the probate process is overseen by the county surrogate's court. While probate may seem daunting, understanding the steps involved can make it more manageable. In this guide, we will delve into how to handle probate of an estate in New Jersey, from the initial steps to closing the estate.

Posted on August 11, 2023

1. Understanding Probate

First, it's essential to understand what probate is and when it's required. Probate ensures that the deceased person's debts are paid and that their assets are distributed according to their will. If the decedent did not leave a will, then assets are distributed according to New Jersey’s intestacy laws.

a. When is Probate Required?

Probate is generally required in New Jersey when:
- The deceased person owned assets in their name only.
- The assets do not have designated beneficiaries.
- The assets aren’t jointly owned.

2. Initiating the Probate Process

a. Locate the Will: If the deceased left a will, it should be the guiding document throughout the probate process. Ensure that you have the original will, as most surrogate's courts require it.

b. Petition the Surrogate’s Court: To start the probate process, the executor named in the will (or an interested party if there's no will) must submit necessary documents and forms to the surrogate’s court in the county where the decedent lived. You'll need to:
- Provide the original will and a certified copy of the death certificate.
- Complete a probate application.
- Pay the probate fee, which varies based on the estate's size.

Once the will is validated and the executor is approved, they will receive "Letters Testamentary," granting them authority to act on behalf of the estate.

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      3. Gather Estate Assets

      The executor is responsible for identifying and securing all the decedent’s assets. This can include:

      - Bank accounts
      - Real estate
      - Personal property
      - Investments
      - Insurance policies

      4. Notify Creditors and Settle Debts

      The executor must also identify the deceased’s creditors and notify them of the death. In New Jersey, the executor should advertise the death in a local newspaper to notify potential unknown creditors. Once notified, creditors generally have nine months to make claims against the estate.

      Debts can include:
      - Mortgages
      - Car loans
      - Credit card balances
      - Medical bills

      It's crucial to ensure that all valid debts are paid before distributing the estate assets to the beneficiaries.

      5. Tax Considerations

      a. Federal Estate Tax: As of my last update in 2021, estates exceeding a specific value (adjusted yearly for inflation) may be subject to federal estate tax.

      b. New Jersey Estate Tax: Previously, New Jersey had an estate tax, but it was repealed effective January 1, 2018. However, estates may still be subject to inheritance tax.

      c. Inheritance Tax: New Jersey imposes an inheritance tax on certain beneficiaries. The tax rate and exemptions depend on the relationship of the heir to the decedent. For example:
      - Class A beneficiaries (spouse, child, grandchild, parent, etc.) are exempt from inheritance tax.
      - Class C beneficiaries (siblings, son-in-law, or daughter-in-law) have a specific exemption amount, with rates ranging from 11% to 16% on amounts exceeding the exemption.
      - Class D beneficiaries (anyone not in Class A, C, or E) are taxed at a rate of 15% up to $700,000 and 16% on amounts over that.

      d. Income Tax: The estate may also owe income tax for any income generated during the probate process.

      6. Distributing Assets

      After all debts and taxes have been paid, the executor can distribute the remaining assets as the will specifies. If there's no will, assets are distributed according to New Jersey's intestacy laws. Common distributions might include:
      - Specific bequests (e.g., jewelry, personal items)
      - Monetary bequests
      - Residuary bequests (what remains after specific and monetary bequests)

      Stay updated on how to protect everything you’ve worked for so hard during your life.

        7. Closing the Estate

        Once all the above steps are completed:
        - File a final account with the surrogate's court, detailing all financial transactions.
        - Notify beneficiaries and relevant parties of the final account.
        - Obtain releases from beneficiaries, indicating they've received their inheritances and have no further claims.

        After all these steps, the executor can officially close the estate.

        8. Seek Legal Counsel

        Though many of the probate steps can be managed independently, it's always wise to consult with an attorney, especially for larger or more complicated estates. A knowledgeable attorney can help navigate potential pitfalls, ensure compliance with New Jersey laws, and provide guidance on tricky issues.

        Conclusion

        Probating an estate in New Jersey involves numerous detailed steps, from validating the will to ensuring all taxes and debts are paid, and finally, distributing assets to the rightful beneficiaries. Being organized, understanding the legal requirements, and seeking professional advice when needed can help ensure the process runs smoothly and the decedent's wishes are honored.

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